E3 soybeans are expected to be available in Canada from Pioneer in 2020.

New option launched to manage resistant weeds in soybeans

Enlist E3 soybeans are resistant to multiple herbicides meaning more options to deal with weed issues

Ontario farmers will have more options to manage herbicide-resistant weeds with the launch of Enlist E3 soybeans in Canada. E3 soybeans are resistant to 2,4-D, glyphosate and glufosinate herbicides. That provides more flexibility when spraying fields that have resistant weeds, which are becoming an increasing problem in Ontario, especially when it comes to glyphosate. Why […] Read more

Each waterhemp plant can produce one million seeds, with some producing up to five million.

Glyphosate resistant waterhemp moving across Ontario

With its method of pollination and resistance abilities, the weed is becoming harder to control

Glyphosate-resistant waterhemp is now present in seven counties across Ontario. Huron, Wentworth and Haldimand are the three most recent counties where it was found, in addition to the previous Essex, Lambton, Chatham-Kent and Middlesex counties. Seeds were harvested harvested in fields in these counties last fall, planted in a greenhouse to overwinter and tested once […] Read more

Plants are particularly susceptible to competition in early growth stages.

Plant stress makes early-season weed control critical

Research shows corn and soybeans can sense the presence of weeds even before emergence

Do you get anxious about weeds in the field? Your crops sure do, and according to new research, yield reductions from early-season weed pressure can happen extremely quickly. Research in the late 1980s established the significant yield impacts caused by weeds if they are not properly controlled early in the growing season, says Clarence Swanton, […] Read more

Steve Shirtliffe demonstrates a min-till rotary hoe.

Evaluating mechanical weed control options

Researchers found that when two methods are used, weed control improves

With the rise of herbicide resistant weeds, researchers at the University of Saskatchewan are looking into alternative weed control methods focused on in-crop mechanical tools to give growers new management options. Why it matters: Farmers are looking for alternative solutions to deal with herbicide resistant weeds that are becoming tougher to control and are affecting […] Read more

Josh Lade drives his John Deere S680 combine with the Seed Terminator installed near Osler, Sask.

Seed terminator installed on combine

An Australian brought the system when he moved to Canada

An Australian farming in Canada is using a hammer mill on his combine to reduce his dependence on herbicide applications. Now farming in Saskatchewan, the producer brought a Seed Terminator from Down Under to test its pulverizing abilities on prairie weed seeds this harvest. Why it matters: Alternative weed control methods will gain added importance […] Read more


SWAC 2019 conference: The Road Ahead

What to see and look for at the 2019 Southwest Agricultural Conference

Producers attending the 2019 Southwest Agricultural Conference will have their agronomic and farm business mind stimulated. The conference, with the theme: The Road Ahead is coming to the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown Campus on Jan. 3-4. Speakers will share the latest on topics ranging from nutrient management to marketing, compaction to pest management, precision agriculture […] Read more

Peter Sikkema told edible bean growers that 2,4-D is a glyphosate-resistant Canada fleabane control option, if the treatment is registered.

Edible bean growers could get more weed control options

Ridgetown College research shows that older chemistries can help control glyphosate-resistant weeds in strip till

When the Weed Society of America challenged its members to evaluate weed pressure on field crops, Peter Sikkema found that in Ontario edible beans were most challenged by weed pressure. “The crop I work on that is most affected by weed interference is dry beans,” the professor at University of Guelph’s Ridgetown campus said at […] Read more

Over 30 years, the active ingredient volume of herbicide applied on crops has declined in Ontario, mostly because glyphosate 
is applied at lower rates than the herbicides it replaces.

Glyphosate drives long-term herbicide changes

Ontario keeps track of detailed herbicide use every five years, which shows how the use of active ingredient has declined

A study of glyphosate use in Ontario shows the herbicide has created significant change in crop management. It shows that while corn and soybean acreage and yield have increased in the province since 1983, the impact of herbicide use per acre has declined, in large part because glyphosate has displaced other herbicide chemistries. Why it […] Read more