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Reimagining what collaboration can mean

Preview: Canada's Digital Farm Show, Sept. 15-18

Reading Time: 4 minutes

New for 2020, Canada’s Digital Farm Show is reimagining what collaboration can mean among farm groups, academics, researchers and industry partners across Canada.

With so many field days across Ontario and Eastern Canada cancelled due to COVID-19, we’re offering a way to shrink geographic distances and give farmers access to timely field information from farmer-led research all in one online platform.

Content sessions

Related Articles

Roller Crimper Demo, presented by Soils at Guelph, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association

Jake Munroe, Soil Management Specialist (Field Crops), Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

Is it possible to be organic and no-till? In 2019, a few Ontario farmers with the help of OMAFRA soil specialist, Jake Munroe, set out to find an answer. In this interview, Jake explains the ins and outs of the system, terminating with a roller crimper, results from 2019, and lessons learned for those who would be interested to try it themselves.

Leadership and Learning Opportunities with Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA)

Eric Dietrich, Middlesex Soil & Crop Improvement Association; Matt Smith, 2019 President, Kent Soil and Crop Improvement Association; Cory Cowan, Director, Kent Soil and Crop Improvement Association; and Ken Nixon Director, Middlesex Soil and Crop Improvement Association

Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) membership videos feature members who are active in their local county associations, talking about why they joined and how they became involved in the organization. Local and regional OSCIA groups plan various field trial projects, producer information meetings, summer tours, and informative newsletters. From sitting on different committees and boards to taking on leadership roles, members describe the many benefits of being an active part of OSCIA. For more information, visit ontariosoilcrop.org

Educational Workshops to Move Your Business Forward with Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA)

Margaret May, Regional Program Lead, Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association & Cathy Dibble, Thames Valley Regional Communication Coordinator and Workshop Leader, Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association

In the OSCIA Educational Workshop video, Margaret May, and Cathy Dibble talk about the free workshops delivered by OSCIA across the province. The Environmental Farm Plan workshop helps producers assess environmental impacts of their farming operation and guides them towards actions to reduce risks and make improvements to their farming practices. The Grow Your Farm Profits workshop focuses on the business management aspects of the farm, helps producers determine their strengths and weaknesses and to prioritize goals. The Biosecurity Workshops guide producers through various biosecurity assessments of their operation, for both livestock and crop production concerns. A list of all workshop dates and locations can be found at ontariosoilcrop.org

Ontario’s Agricultural Planning Tools Suite (AgriSuite)

Christine Brown, Sustainability Specialist (Field Crops), Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs & Jake Munroe, Soil Management Specialist (Field Crops), OMAFRA

Ontario’s Agricultural Planning Tools Suite (AgriSuite) is an online system developed by OMAFRA. AgriSuite is a web application that hosts OMAFRA’s nutrient management planning software, called NMAN, and the Minimum Distance Separation (MDS) Formulae software. AgriSuite will host other resources as they become available.

The NMAN software has a series of functions and worksheets that you can use for your business. The system can help you to save money by potentially reducing the amount of fertilizer and other materials used and reduce the environmental impact of on-farm generated nutrients. It can also help to protect sources of drinking water, reduce soil erosion and maintain soil productivity.

The MDS Formulae software has a series of worksheets that municipalities, land use planning consultants and nutrient management consultants can use to help calculate MDS setbacks to reduce the potential for land use conflicts due to odour and calculate MDS setbacks in accordance with the requirements of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) issued under the Planning Act.

Soils at Guelph: Advancing Sustainable Soil Management in Ontario

Cameron Ogilvie, Knowledge Mobilization Co-ordinator, Soils at Guelph; Dr. Claudia Wagner-Riddle, Professor, School of Environmental Sciences at the University of Guelph; and Gordon Bell, Graduate Student, School of Environmental Sciences at the University of Guelph

Research offers results that you can bet the farm on. But staying up to date on the latest research and wading through the technical jargon can be overwhelming. Therefore, Soils at Guelph aims to bridge gaps between researchers, farmers, crop advisors, industry members, and other stakeholders to help manage soil sustainably with science-backed decisions. In this feature, Soils at Guelph’s Knowledge Mobilization Co-ordinator, Cameron Ogilvie, explains more about the initiative’s activities and provides a tour of a world-class soil health monitoring station near Elora, Ont. Riddle and Bell also share findings from this experiment looking at the impact of crop rotations and cover crops on soil health, water quality, microbes, and greenhouse gasses.

Money Grows on Trees — Managing Farm Woodlots

Bruce Kropf, President, B. Kropf Forestry Service Ltd.

A well-managed woodlot can be the key to extra income on your farm. Plus, woodlots are an ecosystem capable of supporting life, holding water for the land and providing oxygen for the area. They can even provide recreation like walking paths or land for hunting. Unmanaged, large trees block the sunlight required for new growth. Bacteria or spores could grow and infect other trees.

Bruce Kropf is a commercial logger and forest manager in southwestern Ontario, harvesting timber off private land to help farmers manage their woodlots for both long- and short- term gains. Bruce walks us through a woodlot and explains how to maintain it.

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